Douthat: Puddleglum and the Savage

November 23, 2013 by History in a Hurry

Puddleglum and the Savage

By ROSS DOUTHAT

Published: November 23, 2013

THEY died in their homes, not from an assassin’s bullet, and in their 60s, not in their prime. When C. S. Lewis collapsed in his Oxford bedroom, the presidential motorcade was leaving Love Field. When Aldous Huxley requested a final shot of LSD, a TV set in the next room had just blared the news that the president had been shot. And then the coincidence of two of modernity’s keenest critics dying on the same November day was lost in a storm of headlines and public grief.

It’s too soon to reclaim Nov. 22, 1963, for Huxley and Lewis, and reassign John F. Kennedy to a lower rung of historical significance, where some of us suspect his presidency belongs. But pausing amid this month’s Kennedy-anniversary coverage to remember the two British-born writers offers a useful way to think about the J.F.K. mythos as well.

Continue reading:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/24/opinion/sunday/douthat-puddleglum-and-the-savage.html?_r=0

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